Tips To Hire for House Flipping

A few years ago, house flipping became a big business. It became so big that there had been more than five reality shows about house flipping and these shows rated high on viewership. In 2015, house flipping is still a very profitable real estate business, which you can get into if you have enough capital. House flipping is basically buying an abandoned house, renovating it then selling it at a good price. If you are interested in getting into the house flipping business, you need to know the people you should hire in order to help you from start to finish.

1. A reliable architect

Architects may be well-known as house designers, but they are also good in checking the state of a building-whether it is well-built, strong and whether you can change some parts of the house without sacrificing stability. Having an architect in your team is an advantage to your flipping business because some of your competitors may not have their own architects. Choose an architect who has a good record and who is willing to do the job based on your budget.

2. A good interior designer and decorator

It’s hard to sell a house if the interior is not well-designed. That is why you definitely should hire an interior designer. Interior designers are artists whose canvas is the interior of buildings. They will help you find the best color to paint the walls, placement of the furnishings and the decorations to make the house attractive to prospective buyers. In order to avoid conflicts about the look of the home interior, make sure the interior designer you choose is someone you feel comfortable with and has the same taste as you when it comes to decorations.

3. A fast renovation company

When choosing a renovation company to do the actual repair and remodeling of the house you are flipping, you have to ensure that they have enough qualified workers who can work fast so you can get your investment back fast. Remember, you have competitors in this business too and if they finish their house faster than you do, they may steal away your potential client. However, don’t sacrifice quality for speed too or else no one will trust you again. Remember, a renovation company with high-quality and efficient builders is what you want.

4. Real estate broker

Having a real estate broker is optional, but is advised. Real estate brokers have the necessary knowledge about finding possible buyers as well as connections that can help them find people looking for homes. The real estate broker you choose should be someone you can trust, and this person should have no past or present involvements in any disputes. You can check on your city for list of real estate brokers who are licensed for this job.

House flipping is a profitable business, especially if you have the right people in your team. The list above should help guide you in finding and choosing reliable teammates on your quest to make profits from house flipping.

All About Home Appraisals

A home appraisal is a critical component of any real estate transaction that involves a mortgage loan. If you are refinancing you will need an appraisal, if you are selling your home to someone that needs to get a mortgage, he or she will need to have an appraisal done.

What Is a Home Appraisal?

A home appraisal is an opinion on value by a qualified, unbiased third party. Mortgage lenders require an appraisal to be completed when you are refinancing your mortgage. An appraisal is also completed in a transaction when someone is buying a home to make sure they have not over paid for it.

Mortgage Lenders require appraisal to ensure that homeowners are not over paying for a property because if the borrower stops paying for the mortgage the lender will take action to remove the borrower from the home and sell it to recoup their money, this is why it is important for the home to be worth more than the money loaned. In essence, a home appraisal is a lawyer of protection for the mortgage lender.

The Appraisal Process and How Appraisal Values Are Determined

These are the main factors that influence your home’s appraisal value: current market trends which are reflected in the comparable properties the appraiser selects, the house’s features,, square footage, number rooms/bedrooms & bathrooms, condition, is the property considered up to date, landscaping and exterior condition and parking (garage). The appraiser will do an interior and exterior inspection for the above noted factors and will also make note of any deferred maintenance which will be included in the report for the lender.

The appraiser will complete his report on a standard report form that is required by their appraisal jurisdiction. The information that has to be included in an appraisal report will not vary much from Canada to the United States.

A standard report includes the following: comparable sales, a street map, building sketch, square footage, photos of the front, back and street scene of the home, photographs of each comparable property used; a map showing the location of the comparables in relation to the subject property, plot map, description of intended users of the appraisal report, photo and description of each room in the house.

The cost of a residential appraisal report ranges from $250-$500 and the homeowner is typically responsible for paying the appraiser..

What Homebuyers Need to Know

When you’re buying a home an appraisal could potentially sink your deal. If you make an offer to purchase a house, towards the end of the home buying process your mortgage lender will require that the home being purchased be appraised. If the home appraises for less than your offer to purchase the lender will not provide the loan, however, this could be good for a buyer as well because you may be able to negotiate to lower purchase price but very often at the point of the home appraisal in the buying process an agreement of purchase and sale is already in place.. If a bad appraisal is standing between you and your home purchase, look into getting a second opinion via a second appraisal. Appraisers are not perfect and it is possible for them to make mistakes.

What Home Sellers Need to Know

As a seller, a low appraisal means that you may have to lower your home’s price to get it sold. Lenders won’t approve loans for more than a home is worth, and holding out for an all-cash buyer who doesn’t require an appraisal as a condition of completing the transaction is unlikely to net you a higher sales price. No one wants to overpay for a home but more importantly a mortgage lender will not over lend on the value of a property, therefor if the appraisal comes in lower than what your buyer is offering this will likely sink your deal unless you lower the price.

What Refinancing Homeowners Need to Know

If you’re refinancing your mortgage and looking to access some of the equity in the home the appraised value is very important. Mortgage lenders will have maximum loan to value ratio that they will go up to so the larger the difference between what you owe on your current mortgage and what the home is appraised at obviously the better. Having a better loan to value ratio will also make obtaining the lowest possible mortgage rates possible. Lenders put a lot of emphasis on this ratio so a high appraisal value is very important.

The Bottom Line

The home appraisal is a very standard process these days in any real estate transaction involving a mortgage loan, it should be taken serious, you should know how the appraisal works and what the value is based upon, if you feel your home is undervalued you can speak with the appraiser and make your case or get a second opinion.

Hi! My name is Bryce, I graduated with a B.A. in Business from Lakehead University, and have been working as a home appraiser for the last few years in Ontario, Canada and I’m the guy behind HowToImproveHomeAppraisalValue.com and I want to teach you how to maximize your home appraisal value. Visit: [http://howtoimprovehouseappraisalvalue.com/] for more info

Common Mistakes On Your Realtor

OK OK… I don’t really mean to not trust your Realtor or other advisors, unless they give you really bad advice, like the three mistakes outlined in this article. Many Realtors understand how to value real estate and can be a great asset (especially the ones that focus on real estate investors), but the unfortunate truth is that many investors and agents make these common mistakes:

· Add value to a property for a bedroom

· Incorrectly adjusting for square footage

· Compare non similar style homes with no adjustment

Add value to a property for a bedroom

This is by far the most common error that I see. In some cases a bedroom will add value but normally you cannot count on it. If a house has more bedrooms it is likely bigger and the large home is more valuable, but the bedroom itself is not adding the value, the square footage is. If two houses are the same size and one has an additional bedroom it is lacking something else OR has much smaller rooms, which will deter some buyers. It is basically a wash for valuation purposes. The one exception to this is if the house does not conform to the neighborhood. For example, if the entire neighborhood is two or three bedrooms and you have a one bedroom, it actually should add value to add a bedroom, even if you are keeping the house the same size. I would be very careful in these rare cases because it is hard to know how much value a bedroom will actually add. So when you are looking at your comps, look at the size and not the number of bedrooms.

This does not hold true for bathrooms. Bathrooms will almost always add value.

Incorrectly adjust for square footage

A less common, but more devastating error that I see is to use a price per square foot model to value a home. Many agents make this mistake. The error is to use an average price per square foot and multiply that number by the size of the house you are trying to value. It is not wise to use this method, especially if your house is on the small or large size for an area. Think about it. Is a 2,000 square foot house really worth twice as much as a 1,000 square foot house that might be next door? The area brings a certain range of values that all houses fall in and the lot values should be close to identical no matter what size house is on it. Using a price per sq foot model does not account for the lot.

It is true that you need to adjust for size, because larger homes carry more value, but it is easy to mess the adjustment up. The best way to do this is to dig into your comps and get an idea for the required adjustment. This can be very tricky because the value per square foot decreases as the homes get larger. It is a safe bet to never buy the largest or smallest house in an area, but if you do, use a very conservative adjustment for size. One rule of thumb that I like to use is 1/3rd of the average price per square foot as the size adjustment. This is pretty close to average, so it is nice; but again is a rule of thumb and is not science.

Keep in mind that the adjustments that I mentioned are above the ground adjustments. Basements do NOT carry the same value. In fact, it is normally worth less than half of the above ground square footage. For example, in a nice area an above ground adjustment might be $90.00 above ground but basements in that area might only be worth an adjustment of $30.00 per finished sq foot. I never have understood this because if finished it is usable/livable space and people love basements. I gave up trying to understand why the basement has little value and have just accepted it. You don’t need to understand why it is true as long as you know it is true and use that to help come up with an accurate value.

Compare non similar style homes with no adjustment

This one makes me laugh when I hear it. The biggie that I see here is comparing the ranch or rambler style home to a home with stairs, like a bi-level or 2-story. The house with no stairs is always more valuable. You need to think of yourself as the buyer and what a buyer would want. Another common example of this mistake is comparing older homes to newer homes. In fact, we just took a call today from a client that was comparing her home to a never been lived in house one neighborhood over. They were almost identical in size and were within a quarter of a mile to each other, but one is about 30 years old and one was just built. Do you really think that someone would buy a used home for the same price they can get a new home for? The newer home is worth more, so it is best to not even use that comp; but if you need to use it, be sure to adjust for the age.

My hope is that by understanding these common mistakes you will be able to come up with more accurate after repaired values, and be a better investor for it.

Trends in Real Estate Nowadays

For most people, the word “house” conjures certain images found in childhood drawings. If you have a building with mostly right angles, a single front door, a few chest-high windows, and a chimney, you’ve probably got a prototypical home. However, real estate is a changing field, and people are seeking unique housing options that don’t quite fit inside the box.

Tiny Houses

By all definitions, tiny houses possess most of the features of their more spacious counterparts, just in a much more condensed way. A favorite in both rural and urban areas, tiny houses are as much a choice in dwelling as a statement of one’s principles. While there is no presently agreed-upon size restriction before a domicile is no longer “tiny,” 500 square meters is an accepted point in some circles. Got a few too many boxes of t-shirts weighing you down? Tired of walking such great lengths to get to the light-switch before bed? Trying to keep your real estate tax down to a minimum? A tiny house might be for you.

Passive Houses

Not entirely in another world from tiny houses, passive houses are for those trying to reduce their environmental impact. Less a set of aesthetic rules and more an internal set of standards to maximize energy efficiency, this enterprising style is making considerable in-roads in the real estate market. Originating in Germany in the late 1980s, the style has slowly found a niche amongst people with a penchant for all things “green.”

Staples of these energy-efficient dwellings are superinsulation, airtightness, advanced window technology, solar techniques, and many others. Passive houses incorporate the entire system of real estate, so even the landscaping is efficient. For example, trees that shade parts of the dwelling appropriately and wind-reducing hedges can be a part of the design.

Treehouses

Perhaps living in trees will never constitute a substantial amount of the real estate world, but there is no question that they are gaining popularity. From increasing prevalence as an airbnb destination to a full-time paradise for more intrepid souls, life in a treehouse offers a lot of simple perks, as well as some drawbacks. Clearly for the more adventurous, many treehouses are entirely off the grid, and many of them are not quite up to code. Even a cursory internet search will reveal numerous forums on the subject of whether or not certain dwellings are legally allowed to be inhabited. Treehouse owners have to contend with being mindful of protected trees, wildlife protection acts, and other tight restrictions. If all of the criteria are met, however, the resulting home is something of a nature-lover’s paradise.

These alternative designs and ideas scratch the surface of present trends in housing. While they aren’t likely to replace conventional homes any time soon, they might be an indication of where things are headed.